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Prisoners Of The Japanese:
Literary Imagination And The Prisoner Of War Experience

by

Prisoners of the Japanese is the first book to analyse the major fictions of the prisoner-of-war experience under the Japanese.

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Overview

Many of us have read books or watched films based on the prisoner-of-war experience under the Japanese. It’s probably true to say that several postwar generations of Americans, Britons, and Australians, although no doubt aware of the many memoirs and diaries of former prisoners of war of the Japanese, have almost certainly constructed their understanding of that experience largely from its popular fictions.

To date, academic studies have concentrated on non-fiction prisoner-of-war writing: the many memoirs and diaries of former prisoners of the Japanese. Prisoners of the Japanese is the first book to analyse the major fictions of the prisoner-of-war experience under the Japanese. It covers The Bridge on the River Kwai, Nevil Shute’s A Town Like Alice, J G Ballard’s Empire of the Sun and John Doyle’s ABC television drama Changi.

Prisoners of the Japanese will appeal to scholars and students of film and media, literature, cultural history, or war studies as well as to general readers interested in literature and film of the Second World War.


Details

Roger Bourke

Roger Bourke has an MA in English from the University of Cambridge and a PhD from the University of Western Australia. He has worked as a journalist, media consultant and academic editor. Prisoners of the Japanese is his first book.